SILICON VALLEY KIDS

Should it come as a surprise that the children of Technology Executives and creators raise their children to be "tech free?"

"The tech companies do know that the sooner you get kids, adolescents, or teenagers used to your platform, the easier it is to become a lifelong habit," a former google employee told Business Insider

 

Turning kids into loyal customers of unhealthy products isn't exactly a new strategy. Some estimates find that major tobacco companies spend nearly $9 billion a year, or $24 million a day, marketing their products in the hopes kids will use them for life. The same principle helps explain why fast-food chains offer kids' meals: Brand loyalty is lucrative.

It has been well documented  that the two biggest tech figures in recent history — Bill Gates and Steve Jobs — seldom let their kids play with the very products they helped create.

There's a Waldorf school in Silicon Valley that allows very limited technology.  The school has no computers, no iPads, no iPhones. They try to minimize tech altogether and so people enjoy a lot of time face-to-face, they go outside a lot. What's interesting about this school is 75% of the students there are the children of Silicon Valley tech execs. These are people who, publicly, will expound on the wonders of the products they're producing and at the same time they decided in all their wisdom that their kids didn't belong in a school that used that same tech.

A global report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) suggests education systems that have invested heavily in computers have seen “no noticeable improvement” in their results for reading, maths and science in the Programme for International Student Assessment (Pisa) tests. The OECD’s education director, Andreas Schleicher says: “If you look at the best-performing education systems, such as those in East Asia, they’ve been very cautious about using technology in their classroom.”

“Those students who use tablets and computers very often tend to do worse than those who use them moderately,” he adds.