STATISTICS

  • Using data collected between 2010 and 2015 from more than 500,000 adolescents nationwide, Twenge’s study found kids who spent three hours or more a day on smartphones or other electronic devices were 34% more likely to suffer at least one suicide-related outcome—including feeling hopeless or seriously considering suicide

  • Kids who used electronic devices five or more hours a day, 48% had at least one suicide-related outcome.

  • In 2015, 36 percent of all teens reported feeling desperately sad or hopeless, or thinking about, planning or attempting suicide, up from 32 percent in 2009. For girls, the rates were higher — 45 percent in 2015 versus 40 percent in 2009.

STRENGTH IN CHILDREN HAS DECLINED

■ The number of sit-ups 10-year-olds can do declined by 27.1% between 1998 and 2008

■ Arm strength fell by 26% and grip strength by 7%

■ While one in 20 children in 1998 could not hold their own weight when hanging from wall bars, one in 10 could not do so in 2008.

TRADITIONAL CHILDHOOD GAMES DEEMED UNSAFE AND BANNED FROM ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

  • As a category of accidents, motor vehicle fatality is the leading cause of death to teenagers, representing over one-third of all deaths.

  • 1 out of every 4 car accidents in the United States is caused by texting and driving.

  • 11 teens die every day as a result of texting while driving.

  • In 2015 42% of teens say they have texted while driving—and texting and driving is the leading cause of death in teens.

  • One-fourth of teenagers respond to at least one text message every time they drive and 20% of teens and 10% of parents report having multi-text message conversations while driving.

  • Pedestrians who text are 4x less likely to look before crossing the street, cross in crosswalks, or obey traffic signals.

  • Governors Highway Safety Association study shows that the number of pedestrians killed in traffic jumped 11 percent last year, to nearly 6,000. That's the biggest single-year increase in pedestrian fatalities ever, and the highest number in more than two decades.

  • Answering a text takes away your attention for about five seconds. Traveling at 55 mph, that's enough time to travel the length of a football field.

  • Texting while driving causes a 400% increase in time spent with eyes off the road.

  • Of all cell phone related tasks, texting is by far the most dangerous activity.

  • According to a AAA poll, 94% of teen drivers acknowledge the dangers of texting and driving, but 35% admitted to doing it anyway.

  • 21% of teen drivers involved in fatal accidents were distracted by their cell phones.

Dr. Jean Twenge Research
shows many problems with 
iGen,  the generation born
between 1995-2012.